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Emir Hasanbegovic

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The power and structure of push: Second screen solution

Originally posted at EmirWeb by Emir Hasanbegovic

Second screen has been a buzzword for quite some time and rightfully so. Getting our tech gadgets to work as one has always been a desire. With the adoption of phones as the dominant personal computer over the last few years, we’ve naturally wanted to connect everything to them.

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Device Wall: A second screen experiment

Also posted at EmirWeb by Emir Hasanbegovic.

Recently Pivotal Labs decided to push mobile devices to the limit by connecting multiple devices to one other in order to have them behave as one. Through the use of image recognition, optical character recognition, persistent low cost connections and a whole lot of ingenuity Pivotal Labs was able to put together an innovative and unique experience.

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Practical Android Design

This article was originally published on Emir Hasanbegovic‘s blog.

I have seen many design mockups for Android applications that were beautiful but did not translate appropriately to devices. The mock up/design process tends to happen separately or before the development process and reconciling the two can become a time-consuming process.

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Google TV: The Full Monty

This article was originally published on Emir Hasanbegovic‘s blog.

Synopsis

Some time has passed since my initial investigation of Google TV. While this is still relevant, a lot is happening. OEMs are starting to show their support with different Google TV implementations and Google has also kept their partners busy with newer operating system releases.

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Java Threads, an Inconvenient Truth

This is cross-posted on Emir’s blog.

A good understanding of multi-threading in the traditional unix memory model is required for the following tutorial.

Traditional Unix Threads

With the traditional c model one could fork(). This would create a child and parent, the child would copy the parent’s memory space and they would communicate through sockets, which were essentially files.

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