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Groovy 2.4 And Grails 3.0 To Be Last Major Releases Under Pivotal Sponsorship

featured-GroovyGrails-sunset Pivotal today announced that it will fund the next two major releases of the Groovy and Grails through March 31st, 2015, after which it will no longer directly fund development on these open source projects. Since the acquisition of G2One by SpringSource in 2008, SpringSource, VMware, and subsequently Pivotal have collectively sponsored the Groovy and Grails projects.

Groovy is an agile and dynamic language for the Java Virtual Machine that builds upon the strengths of Java but has additional power features inspired by languages like Python, Ruby and Smalltalk. Groovy makes modern programming features available to Java developers with almost-zero learning curve. Grails is an open source, full stack, web application framework for the JVM. It takes advantage of the Groovy programming language and convention over configuration to provide a productive and stream-lined development experience.

The decision to conclude its sponsorship of Groovy and Grails is part of Pivotal’s larger strategy to concentrate resources on accelerating both commercial and open source projects that support its growing traction in Platform-as-a-Service, Data, and Agile development. Pivotal has determined that the time is right to let further development of Groovy and Grails be led by other interested parties in the open source community who can best serve the goals of those projects.

Both Groovy and Grails have a small group of dedicated developers and contributors, and an active core on Github. In the spirit of good stewardship and a commitment to open source, the March 31st deadline provides both projects time to put out their next major releases, and evolve or secure new sponsorship. Pivotal will honor the terms of any existing Groovy and Grails commercial support contracts that extend beyond March 31st.

Pivotal is exploring several options for the Groovy and Grails projects and teams, trusting that the community will continue to develop strong solutions after its dedicated developer sponsorship expires. Pivotal will maintain both support and staffing of the small teams dedicated to these projects through that period.

After March 31st, Pivotal will continue to fund the Grails website (http://grails.org), an application that is used by thousands of developers globally, to release and publish plug-ins via the Pivotal Web Services hosted plug-in portal. Groovy also has a strong and active user base outside of Pivotal, where a number of Java developers have been acquainted with Groovy through the Gradle build automation framework.

Interested Groovy and Grails sponsors or parties should contact Pivotal at gg-sponsorship@pivotal.io.

Existing support contracts for active G&G customers will be honored to the end of the current contract term. Contact Pivotal customer support for details at customer-service@pivotal.io.

For additional background, please visit our FAQ here.

Comments
  1. Is this something to be concerned about? Is it likely to find another viable sponsor or sponsors for both projects? I understand that “business is business” but isn’t a time period of less than three months (until March 31, 2015) too short? What will happen to the both project’s respective lead deverlopers?

    Expectations really need to be managed correctly, with regards to this issue. Transparency and a correct handling of the “hand-over” process are paramount.

    • Stacey Schneider Stacey Schneider says:

      As stated in the FAQ, Pivotal will honor the terms of any existing Groovy and Grails commercial support contracts that extend beyond March 31st.

      Pivotal is exploring several options for the Groovy and Grails projects and teams, trusting that the community will continue to develop strong solutions after its dedicated developer sponsorship expires. Pivotal will maintain both support and staffing of the small teams dedicated to these projects through that period.

      • DM says:

        Pivotal is exploring several options for the Groovy and Grails projects and teams

        Like what?

        • Stacey Schneider Stacey Schneider says:

          At this point in time, we prefer to weigh the options and are hopeful this expanded global discussion will create some additional options for these teams and projects. When we have a specific plan, we will be sure to share with the larger community.

  2. liyu says:

    This remind me way back when Spring tried to change their license and I stopped use Spring since then.

  3. Christoph Henrici says:

    I don’t get it: Concentrating the resources…. as i understand the Groovy and Grails core developer team is small…. so what’s there to concentrate ….. it’s to me like desperate move… is Grails & Groovy only the first in a line to go… that’s how i understand the announcement. I would like to hear a word about a long term strategy in terms of OSS.

  4. Andy Miles says:

    I hope Red Hat take Groovy and Grails. They will fit there well. I’d love to see Groovy become more pervasive.

  5. This is disappointing, but Groovy and Grails will live on. I guess I could see them not doing Grails, because they have Spring Boot the future underlying of Grails, but Pivotal has been showing Groovy as a part of their overall architecture. Seems like a a short sighted corporate move.

    Maybe Google could be the next big sponsor considering the upcoming Android support in Groovy 2.4.

    • Mike Miller says:

      Agreed. I would love to see a large company/organization take over the Groovy and Grails projects. Google might be a good fit now that the Android build system is Gradle, based on Groovy – so the Groovy language must continue to be supported and grow.

      Guess only time will tell.

  6. Houcem Berrayana says:

    So sad to hear such news.

  7. jose carlos says:

    Sorry I can’t see it as good news for Grails… they have such competition against Typesafe and all of those amazing stuff, on the other side, there are new frameworks in pure JS approach and server too… bad times for discontinuation!

  8. Charles S. says:

    This news is unfortunate, and I really hope someone picks up the project and the excellent team of developers. I have been successfully using Grails and Groovy for the past four years with a few apps running smoothly in production, and am architecting even more projects based on the framework. The ease, flexibility and safety (being that it’s still Java) of the framework save project dollars in many ways, from new development to O&M costs. Everyone is happy with it!

  9. Paul Verest says:

    It is too early to judge whether it is good news or bad.

    It may turn out that there will be several companies leading under some banner like Eclipse or Apache
    or smaller company will lead on, say Gradle.com
    But if everybody will be saying that this is bad, so it will be.

    In any case, it is opened test for a newer G&G and the future is interesting.

    Personally I like frameworks that are not being lead by just one big company.

  10. Ron Pomeroy says:

    I’m curious if this also means backing away from Gradle.

    Pivotal?

    Regards,

    Ron

  11. Person says:

    I like it !

  12. Will Woodman says:

    this is pretty sad really – grails IDE today supports the 2 line – but not the grails 3 –

    I had to download luna and groovy eclipse separately to play with grails 3 – but of course theres no IDE/ui validation etc for 3 – as grails 2 IDE doesn’t recognise grails 3 as a grails project

    I truly hope someone can take this on board and give it a proper home –

    not clear why pivotal wish to drop – I can see the springboot – but grails 3 is building on that core and still complimentary

    I was looking forward to tighter cleaner grails 3/springboot with full IDE support for grails – all a bit sad after all this time. I hope this gets a good home – both elements are a far better java than java and grails is good but needs the right support to nurture it

  13. Ken Kousen says:

    Just a reply for those worried about the future of Groovy and Grails: Both are fine and will be available into the future.

    Groovy has already moved to the Apache Software Foundation. It’s currently an incubator project over there, and recently had its first release under the new system (2.4.4).

    For Grails, Pivotal employed three developers who worked on the framework. Two of them (Graeme Rocher and Jeff Brown) have already moved over to OCI, a company based in St. Louis, which is happy to support new developments. OCI has already hired additional developers to continue that work as well. The Grails 3 version that was released under Pivotal at the end of March has had a couple of small additional releases in June and July.

    In the end, Pivotal only supported six developers, three in Groovy and three in Grails. All of them have found other positions and are continuing to work on the language and the framework. In other words, Pivotal withdrawing support has been a very bad public relations move, but hasn’t actually had that much impact on the future.

    The only long-term ramification of Pivotal’s lack of support is that Groovy/Grails Tool Suite is probably dead. While the Groovy plugin for Eclipse may continue to develop, the Grails support likely won’t. The vast majority of developers have moved on to IntelliJ IDEA (a superior experience in almost every way) or to NetBeans, which has a small but vocal community.

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